RECONCEPTED AD

The Man in the High Castle is an Amazon Studio produced television show released in 2015. It is a fictional story set in North America after the Nazis won WWII. The company decided to advertise the show by displaying Nazi-like propaganda in subway cars and on print ads. Now this is going to get a lot of people’s attention, but obviously not the attention we want. Seriously, I’m going to go out of my way and say it’s never ok to use advertising tactics that are similar to Nazi propaganda – even if that is the plot of the show.

ORIGINAL AD

The specific ad that I am going to re-concept is above this paragraph. I just wanted to give ya'll a little background about how awful the whole campaign was. I chose this specific ad because Lady Liberty is one of the United State's most iconic monuments that represents liberty, independence and freedom. She literally welcomed immigrants as they would sail into America from Germany and Poland. To show this prominent and representative landmark as something that supports the Nazi agenda is a very unsettling brand identity to have.

MY RE-CONCEPT

Out of the entire campaign, the aspect I liked most about it was the tagline (used in separate ads) "The future belongs to those who change it." I wanted to keep this aspect of the design. I took out the giant Statue of Liberty heil-hitlering. I also changed the font to match the one used in the  beginning credits of the show. I darkened the Manhattan skyline to match the ominous feel of the show. My advertisement demonstrates the entirety of the show/brand (dark, eery and suspenseful) without plastering a swastika all over it.

To take this campaign further, instead of putting the Nazi flags on subway train seats, I would instead simply advertise the tagline against a plain background. These simpler ads that don't offer the entirety of the plot to consumers will increase curiosity, thus inspiring them to watch the show.

  • Grey LinkedIn Icon
  • Grey Facebook Icon
  • Grey Instagram Icon

Jenna Anderson

andersonj8@mymail.vcu.edu

(859) 285-9121